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WOW Talk: Inas Al-soqi

Artist Talk

WHEN: Friday 13 April 19:00

After an intense two months residency in WOW, visual artist Inas Al-soqi is going to present the works she produced during her stay in an artist talk with artist Raquel van Haver, who also makes use of collage in her practice.

Al-soqi and van Haver will explore the inspiration sources and processes behind the new series of works that Al-soqi. Further, they will discuss the often forgotten role of collage in contemporary art history, even though this medium has been used by many artists as Henri Matisse, Pablo Picasso, Hannah Höch, Martha Rosler and Robert Rauschenberg.

Inas Al-soqi (Queens, NY)

Inas Al-soqi is a half Palestinian half Romanian woman with a unique sense of humour towards worldly sensibilities. Al-soqi is a heritage-driven artist who works with the cultural diversity she encounters in her trips around the world. During her studies at The School of the Museum of Fine Arts at Tufts University (Boston), she received a solid education in painting, drawing, printmaking, collage work, and art history. Strengthened by a variety of residencies around the world to deepen her techniques and knowledge.

Her collages play with the dichotomy between the sanctioned and the unsanctioned, and that of folk and fine art. They deliver an endearing form of satire as they express an ironic interpretation of class and nobility. The composition of her work addresses the following themes: Eastern culture, Arab culture, early colonial federalism, and violence against women.

Al-soqi’s work has been shown in galleries and museums in New York, Romania, London, Doha, Venice and the Netherlands. Further, her works can be found in museums and private collections throughout several countries: Romania, Italy, France, Germany, the Netherlands, Switzerland, Finland, Morocco, Lebanon, Qatar, and The United States.

For more information, visit her website.


Inas Al-soqi, Pomegranate, collage, 2016
Inas Al-soqi, Uldoz, hand cut collage assembled on paper, 2015